Skip to content Skip to footer

Bitcoin Revival – Crypto Trading Bot Review by Traders

How to use Bitcoin Revival – full review

Trading cryptocurrency is thought of as one of the easiest ways to make money. All you need is a computer, an internet connection, and some basic knowledge about trading platforms. You don’t need any special skills or education and you can start right away.

Things are a little more complicated than that. The crypto environment is unpredictable and many people have lost it all trying to get rich quick. Nowadays, people reach for trading bots which are marketed as the miracle cure for all your crypto troubles.

A crypto bot is a software program that trades on the user’s behalf. It works by scanning the markets for buying and selling opportunities and executing trades to earn profits for the user. Essentially, a trading bot isn’t smarter than the combined brains of its engineer and the trader customizing it.

It turns out, after all, that you do need a bit of skill and know-how to use the bots, before they provide you with their powerful advantages.

But what’s the case for Bitcoin Revival?

The website(s)

The beginning of this little investigation is hopeful. Searching the internet for Bitcoin Revival gives us only one official website.

The web title looks innocent enough, save for the slight overuse of convincing language with “™”, “official”, and “[UPDATED]”. It’s just not something we are used to seeing in other reputable websites. It clutters and distracts from the brand or product name – which should be the main selling point.

Expanding our search to review sites, however, we find 2 additional websites – one from Trustpilot, a trusted public review site, and one from a scam review site.

Finally, one of the websites we discovered via review sites leads us to the 4th and final website of Bitcoin Revival.

So the total number of websites for this project is at least 4. This raises some suspicions based on the fact that it’s very easy and in fact necessary to protect your brand name and funnel all the traffic and interest into one website. 

The Websites

Even though there are “only” 4 websites to analyze in this particular case, the conflicting information and messy job by the creators leaves us with our hands full. Let’s start off with the very first thing. The website addresses and logos. That’s the first thing people associate with a website and a brand, after all.

suspicious domains

The logos are all the same, further raising a question – if one of these were real and other 3 scams, why didn’t the creators of the original one work to protect their brand and users from abuse?

There is no mention in the websites of any copycats nor attempt to protect from any fraudulent impersonation.

There is something even more incriminating hiding in the bottom 2 websites’ links.

Looking at the address it’s clear that the main domain name, what people usually refer to as “the website address” is actually entirely unrelated to Bitcoin Revival. The name of the bot is mentioned only in the directory part of the domain name.

The directory part is usually reserved for different pages of the main website. It’s how you get to, for example, the men’s section, kid’s section, or home page on an e-commerce web page. Here, the entire page is presented in this one directory.

There isn’t an intuitive way to reach the main domain, so we manually trim the web address and the effort brings us here.

suspicious redirect

Empty pages. There’s no telling how many directories there could be on these pages because there’s no way to get here or back to where we came from. Clearly no one is ever meant to come here. No one is ever meant to look behind the curtain.

The Signup

The signup form is the first thing presented to us. It’s generally alright but there are two things to note.

suspicious contact form

First, there is a huge video to the left going on length about Bitcoin. That’s fine, but we’re not here for Bitcoin, we’re here for Bitcoin Revival, a trading bot. None of these websites, for all the images and videos they present, have anything to show in either video or image format related to their bot.

There is no showcasing of the user interface, no design elements, no display of customization options. Nothing. All the language is very generic and, as we’ll see, sometimes contradictory.

The other thing to note here is the fact that phone number is a mandatory field. We’re not given an explanation why that is nor a disclaimer, but one of the websites later on gives us this, somewhat weak possible reason.

false claims

Supposedly, the company offers an onboarding process. This is usually reserved for very few customers, only the most important ones. The ones whose success stories will impact the brand’s reputation the most.

Think about it. For a person to set aside 10 or so minutes per user would mean an absolute maximum of 48 users guided per working day. That’s about 1000 people per month.

When it comes to dealing with crypto projects, especially ones striving to be the top dog, these numbers are pocket change. A drop in the ocean.

It would be completely infeasible to onboard the entire user base like this. Instead, a much more reasonable and normal approach would be to create video and image guides and rely on the agents to catch anyone that might fall through in some sort of a customer support process.

For a company running a relatively simple trading bot it would be entirely unnecessary to maintain such hands-on approach of talking to every single customer.

Another business model, much less legitimate, necessitates this. Scammers rely on social hacking to convince their victims into giving away personal data or money by talking in circles and tiring them out or outright intimidating them.

We cannot say with absolute certainty that this is what would happen to you if you gave away your number, but it’s a thought to keep in mind – now and in general.

Getting Rich

So how rich are we going to get? Are we going to the moon?

false claims

Wait, they managed to contradict themselves on the very same page, in the very next sentence?

Earning 4 times our invested capital would mean a whopping 400%. That’s way above the number of up to 60%. Both numbers are ridiculously high, utopian in fact. It’s just too good to be true.

Let’s play along for the moment. How much would getting filthy rich in just a few days cost us?

false claims

Okay, there’s a $250 deposit for some reason, but it’s good to know that there are no fees.

false claims

Or are there? The two statements contradict each other completely, but both notions are also somewhat ridiculous even when considered separately.

If your business model relied on earning money through transaction fees, it would be in your interest to increase the amount of transactions and get as many users as possible. In that case, the $250 deposit is a ridiculously high entry barrier.

On the other hand, the 2% commission is ridiculously high itself. Also, they do not specify who will be paying this fee. Usually, brokers will split the fee between the two parties in the transaction.

Doing it any other way would disincentivize either buying or selling, which would again negatively affect the environment and decrease the total number of transactions – which goes against your business model.

false claims

Oh wait, another website clears it all up. No fees. Wait, what? No fees? How are these people making money then?

Are we seriously expected to believe that someone developed this complicated and amazing software that will make you into a multi millionaire with just a $250 deposit – but expects nothing in return?

Testimonials

They also attempt to convince us with some success stories. Nothing wrong with that in general, except…

fake testimonials

They are giving away faces, names, locations, and amounts of transactions. If any of these were real it would take any modern criminal minutes to locate them through social media.

What would happen to those people after that is up to your imagination. No company would do this to their customers. It would backfire in a huge scandal very quickly.

Financial matters are not advertised like this anywhere else for a good reason. Other products – sure. Making money is a much more sensitive matter and needs to be treated with a much greater amount of respect.

The Technology Behind It All

Given the total lack of transparency regarding the product itself, we can already rightfully wonder whether there even is a Bitcoin Revival bot. The few instances where they do discuss some of its features do very little to assuage our doubts.

false claims

Which awards? What company exposes their users like this one did but refuses to name awards which are, and should be, a matter of public records. The whole point of an award is to signal to the public the quality of a product.

Also, remember this little detail they mention in the other section. “Time leap feature”. We’ll talk about that one in a minute.

Trustpilot Reviews

The websites can’t keep it straight so we might as well move on to our most reliable external source. Trustpilot’s reviews are public and sometimes verified which makes it a good place to start an investigation. It was able to reveal an additional website to us and here are all the results it shows.

fake reviews on Trustpilot

One of these pages was taken down, the bottom two are empty, leaving us with only one page worth looking at. The reviews on it are very fake-sounding upon close inspection. The language is vague and non-specific and the praise and rating are ridiculously high.

Remember the Time Leap feature? The only thing they gave away about their product?

fake reviews on Trustpilot

Well it just became Time Bounce. Again, they can’t keep the story straight.

A little below that, they finally give mention of an award, but the mistake is even greater because we can easily check that such an organization doesn’t even exist nor do its awards. Complete fabrication.

The address they give us as their company’s headquarters is the following: 91 Wimpole St, Marylebone, W1G 0EF, London, United Kingdom

When we go there, unsurprisingly, there is nothing.

fake address

It’s an office building alright, but no mention can be found anywhere about this revolutionary amazing company turning people into millionaires. The address is a fake. At this point, it’s unsurprising as the information came from them.

The last thing to consider is the domain registrar.

ICANN Lookup

At this point we aren’t holding our breath hoping to find anything useful, but lets check off this box as well anyway, just in case.

domain registrant info

In the case of both somewhat legitimate websites they opted for Cloudflare. This allowed them a level of privacy and protected them from our inquiring gaze.

Cloudflare’s privacy policy may be impenetrable by us, the regular people, but it won’t protect from law enforcement. For us, however, the investigation has reached its satisfying conclusion. Bitcoin Revival is a scam.

FAQ on Bitcoin Revival

What is Bitcoin Revival?

It’s a scam spanning at least 4 websites.

Is Bitcoin Revival a Scam?

According to the many contradictions we’ve seen and the unreasonable claims, as well as the total lack of transparency – yes.

How much money can I make with Bitcoin Revival?

You cannot make money trading with this bot.

Is Bitcoin Revival legit?

Bitcoin Revival is not legit. It’s most definitely a scam.

Leave a comment

fourteen − ten =

English