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Bitcoin Hero – Crypto Trading Bot Review by Traders

How to use Bitcoin Hero – full review

With the steep rise of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies in the past few years, many people are now looking to invest in these digital currencies. Some people are happy to buy thousands of new and cheap coins hoping that their investment will return manifold in a few years.

Others are taking their fortune into their own hands and engaging in active trading, riding the bear and bull runs as best they can. With this approach, more volatility means more risk. More risk means great profits or – losing it all.

Trading Bots allow a trader to eliminate the factor of human reaction time. They also don’t need to sleep, eat, or do any of the other things a normal human being must do. Their market analysis is emotionless and in many ways more objective than a human’s, but there is a limit to their ability.

First, they need to be set up properly. A trader must have at least some basic knowledge about trading. Second, not all bots are created equal. Some are just better than others. Some are free, some are cheap, others are not. 

So, what’s the case for Bitcoin Hero?

A project with two or more different websites is always a cause for suspicion. This can mean that there is something nefarious going on or that they were careless with trademarking and protecting their domain name.

similar domain names

Either way, this alone should make anyone question whether to trust this software with their money. This is a hallmark of most modern trading bot scams.

There are, in fact, at least three websites, two of which are exactly the same but hosted on different domains.

similar domain names

In case you are unfamiliar with domains and their elements, here is a quick breakdown. The most visible, “white” part of the link is the “main domain”, often simply referred to as “the domain”. The grey element preceding it is a subdomain.

Subdomains are used to present different parts of a website, such as the “shop” or a different version of the website for, let’s say, mobile users. You might have encountered links containing the “m.” subdomain.

What stands out here is that the subdomain is what we would expect to see in the main domain name – the name of the project. Instead, we see an entirely unrelated domain. Trimming the link down to navigate to the core, the main domain we see this.

redirect

The website is entirely devoid of content with no way to navigate back to where we came from. The website does not appear in Google search on any reasonable page and looking it up via Google’s “site:” operator gives this.

similar domain names

Take a look at just how many different subdomains this site is juggling. According to Google, it’s about 1980 results. They are running almost 2000 scam operations just from this one site alone! 

The investigation continues, moving on to the content of the website(s) and the claims therein.

phone field in the contact form

What we see here are two typical elements of scams. The phone number field is mandatory, for reasons entirely unclear. This is a non-standard practice in the world of crypto brokerage.

Next, we note the liberal usage of generic Bitcoin-themed stock photos. Scams often make use of such images and large chunks of text talking about anything other than their product – because there is no product.

On to the claims.

Another suspicious element is an offer that is just too good. Think about it. How are these people recouping their investment? Don’t they have to eat or pay bills at the very least? If they are not charging for a service that they invested both time and money in, just how are they making any money?

false claims

$250 is a somewhat large amount for someone who is just looking to start their journey in the crypto world. For many, crypto trading is about as risky as gambling, and while the prospect of getting rich is appealing, not very many people are prepared to give $250 right at the outset.

Furthermore, it’s unclear why the amount is set this high at all. If the platform charges no fees, why would it matter how much money a user is investing and where? To Bitcoin Hero, it wouldn’t matter whether you are making $10 or $10 million.

In the case of this scam (and this is, no doubt, a scam), they have really reigned themselves in. The jargon was kept at a minimum and they even added somewhat credible-looking success story reviews. The language in these is unnaturally clean and vague and it’s a little strange that they all feature nice and clean profile images of the supposed users of this software.

People drawn to crypto are generally people who value privacy and freedom over convenience so having to leave a phone number or telling the whole world just how rich you are goes a little against the logic of the whole culture.

In any case, even the technical jargon is almost bearable right up until…

false claims

They just couldn’t help it – and no wonder. If the scammers don’t add any outlandish elements, the “product” just won’t be appealing enough. Because there is no product and there are no features in reality. Check this one out – “time leap”.

Just how would the software know which direction the price of an asset will move? What algorithms is it using for this analysis? Is it analyzing news via NLP?

These are complicated and expensive technologies and they are, for the most part, effective. If the software really existed and if it were using any of these, you better believe they would want to let the whole world know.

Instead, we get a very generic statement that doesn’t make it clear whether we are dealing with a cheap predictive algorithm or a sophisticated multi-layered analysis system.

Finally, we arrive at this promise, hidden in the “about us” section.

false claims

Another outlandish claim in dire need of context. Does this refer to every single day? Even during a bear run when all the crypto prices are dropping? If so, how? And doesn’t it sound just a little too clean that the lowest possible earning, no matter what, throughout the whole user base is exactly $1000, always?

There should be no doubt in your mind that while this scam is not as ridiculous as some others, the damning key elements of trade bot scams are present in the websites themselves. On to some external sources.

Reviews On Trustpilot

Perhaps a little surprising, given the somewhat convincing nature of the three websites encountered so far, we don’t see any of them on Trustpilot. Instead, we are presented with two entirely new web pages.

fake reviews on Trustpilot

The second review page is empty, but the webpage it links to is interesting. It’s entirely different than all the other ones and seems to be a simple game that’s meant to teach you about trading. It’s not very good at it, but there’s no reason to suspect it’s connected to the scam.

The website linked to the first result is more interesting. The logo and the name connect it to the sites above, as well as the content of the website. In it, we see some information that goes counter to what we’ve seen previously.

false claims

Here, instead of giving the software away for free, we’re told that there is a 2% commission fee. There is nothing wrong with asking for a fee, every other broker does it – that’s how they maintain their operation.

But asking for a 2% flat fee just doesn’t make sense. Brokers usually split the fee between buyer and seller to facilitate trade because burdening only one party with a fee would disincentivize either sale or purchase.

Returning to Trustreview, we can take a look at the information about the company. 

false address

The about section is just plain gobbledygook and meaningless phrases. Near the end we can see another mention of the “time leap” feature… or is it “time bounce”? Not even they know.

Needless to say, there is no such thing as a Global Trading Association and this supposed award doesn’t exist.

Finally, taking a look at the contact section we can try looking up the address to see if we’ll find any clues about the people behind this operation

false address

Unfortunately, the address in question leads to a building with rentable offices and there is no mention of any such company at this location.

The physical location of the office provided is clearly a proxy and probably a fake, but maybe by looking up domain registry information we’ll be able to gather some more clues.

ICANN Lookup

Going through ICANN doesn’t end up providing any additional useful information.

domain name lookup

Unfortunately for us, the scammers are using Cloudflare services. This means that their identity and whereabouts remain out of reach for anyone working outside the scope of law enforcement.

Although our investigation must conclude here without having identified the persons responsible or their actual location, without a doubt we have proven that this project is a scam. Hopefully, that will at least save some people’s time and money.

FAQ on Bitcoin Hero

What is Bitcoin Hero?

It’s a scam. It’s a little more sophisticated and a little better-packaged scam than others, but criminal activity nonetheless.

Is Bitcoin Storm a Scam?

Yes, without a doubt. The use of multiple websites lacking any substantial information, coupled with the total anonymity of the creators makes it conclusive that it is.

How much money can I make with Bitcoin Storm?

You cannot make any money using Bitcoin Storm.

Is Bitcoin Storm legit?

No, most definitely not.

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